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Tucson


Arizona

Obscure Questions About Tucson

When Tucson prospered during the days of the “Wild West,” what notorious “bad guys” experienced Tucson’s charms? Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday first stepped foot in Southern Arizona at Tucson’s train depot before moving south to Tombstone. Geronimo surrendered to the authorities in 1886, one year after the University of Arizona was established. In 1934, Chicago gangster John Dillinger, who had eluded authorities from coast to coast, was peacefully apprehended by the Tucson Police Department.

What do Tucsonans eat for hangover remedy? Menudo – a Mexican soup made of tripe (the stomach lining of cattle) and hominy. The real cure is the high vitamin-B content and the hot chiles in the soup.

What is unusual about Tucson’s Pharmacy Museum? The museum’s collection contains a wad of John Dillinger’s gum, over 60,000 bottles, original drug containers, books, store fixtures, and artifacts from Arizona circa 1880-1950 including several large drug store fixtures from Arizona’s territorial days. The museum is housed in the University of Arizona's College of Pharmacy.

What is the common name for Tucson’s Tohono O’Odham Indian polka music? Chicken Scratch. The Arizona Historical Society’s Annual Waila Festival features this popular dance music.

What is the main ingredient of machaca, the signature dish at Tucson’s El Charro restaurant, the oldest Mexican restaurant in the U.S.? Carne seca (pron. car-nay say-ka). It’s spiced, dried beef.

Why is the Fiesta de los Vaqueros Rodeo Parade famous? It is the longest, non-motorized parade in the world.

Near the turn-of-the-century, Tucson was given a choice by the federal government. Did the city want the state prison, the state university or the state capital. What did Tucson choose and what did Tucson get? Tucson chose the prison and it got the university – a great disappointment for the citizens at the time. Since then the UofA (University of Arizona) has grown into one of the nation’s top research universities.

Today, driving from Tucson to Tombstone on the interstate takes a little over one-hour. In the 1800s, travel to Tombstone was by stagecoach only. How long would Big Nose Kate have had to sit on the Butterfield stagecoach to get from Tucson’s railroad station to Tombstone to see her lover Doc Holliday? Two to three days, travelling about 3-5 miles per hour, assuming no Indian attacks or robbery attempts.

The Interstate 19 from Tucson to Nogales is the only one of its kind in the United States. What makes it unique? It is signed in metric. A failed attempt of the Feds to convert US roads to the metric system.

Some very old laws are made to be broken. In Tucson, according to a law passed during the Victorian-era, what common piece of clothing is illegal for women to wear? It is illegal for women to wear pants.

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Document Information
Source: Metropolitan Tucson CVB, magazineUSA.com, Gil Kenny
Last modified: 20050107
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